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Extensively researched, expertly drafted, photo illustrated PDF sewing patterns for American Girl dolls.

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Civil War dress pattern

8.95
1850 Civil War doll dress pattern by BunnyBear
Civil War dress pattern for American Girl dolls
BunnyBear Civil War dress pattern for 18 inch dolls

Civil War dress pattern

8.95

This design features a princess seamed back, bishop sleeves, and an O bodice. The skirt has a generous tuck appropriate for a young to preteen girl in the Civil War Era. 

A girl's dress in the 1850's was a miniature version of her Mother's, with two exceptions. First, the bodice of a dress for a young girl would close in the back. Front closing garments were for women and girls who were "out” (teens by our modern standards).Second, the skirt lengths were shorter; knee length for toddlers, gradually lengthing as a girl matured.

The appearance of a small waistline was of upmost importance. The look however was not accomplished by tight corsets as dramatized in today’s films, but rather through enlarging other garment elements. 

Arm scythes were sloped, sleeves incredibly full at the elbows, skirts were vast at the hem; even hairstyles, bunched and rolled low on the neck, contributed to the illusion of a tiny waist.

The fan front bodice so popular in the mid to late 40's was modified in 50's. Called the "O" bodice, fullness was gathered at the waist center front and the shoulder pleats were eliminated.

Jewel necklines and decorated sleeve inserts called jockeys were the norm. Due to the length of trim required, skirts were rarely decorated. Hems were faced to provide stability and to save on more expensive fashion fabrics. Growth tucks were very common.

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This design features a princess seamed back, bishop sleeves, and an O bodice. The skirt has a generous tuck appropriate for a young to preteen girl in the Civil War Era. 

A girl's dress in the 1850's was a miniature version of her Mother's, with two exceptions. First, the bodice of a dress for a young girl would close in the back. Front closing garments were for women and girls who were "out” (teens by our modern standards).Second, the skirt lengths were shorter; knee length for toddlers, gradually lengthing as a girl matured.

The appearance of a small waistline was of upmost importance. The look however was not accomplished by tight corsets as dramatized in today’s films, but rather through enlarging other garment elements. 

Arm scythes were sloped, sleeves incredibly full at the elbows, skirts were vast at the hem; even hairstyles, bunched and rolled low on the neck, contributed to the illusion of a tiny waist.

The fan front bodice so popular in the mid to late 40's was modified in 50's. Called the "O" bodice, fullness was gathered at the waist center front and the shoulder pleats were eliminated.

Jewel necklines and decorated sleeve inserts called jockeys were the norm. Due to the length of trim required, skirts were rarely decorated. Hems were faced to provide stability and to save on more expensive fashion fabrics. Growth tucks were very common.

Your pattern will be delivered via download. You will need a PDF reader, like Adobe Acrobat reader, to view and print the pattern. No paper copy will be mailed. The dolls, scenes, clothing and accessories are for display purposes only and are never included in the sale. You are purchasing the PDF pattern only. Due to the nature of PDF patterns all sales are final. No returns, refunds or exchanges.